Category Archives: Publications

New journal articles, Oct. 2020

The State Herbarium of South Australia published two articles on nomenclature and typification, in Vol. 33 of its journal Swainsona online, today 19 Oct. 2020.

(1) F.E. Guard, M.D. Barrett, A. Frid, M. Smith & T. Lebel. Validation of two fungal names in Marasmius Fr. (Marasmiaceae). (88kb PDF).

When publishing two species of fungi, the authors omitted to mention the herbarium, where the type specimen is stored. According to the Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this renders the name invalid. This SHORT COMMUNICATION rectifies the error and published the two fungi names again, following the rules.

(2) D.C. Cargill & K. Beckmann. Typification and identity of Riccia macrospora Stephani (Ricciaceae). (5.2mb PDF).

The authors discuss the type specimens of the liverwort Riccia macrospora, with the result that the specimens deposited in four herbaria represent two different taxa: only the specimens in the herbaria in Geneva and the Natural History Museum, London, are R. macrospora, the other specimens from Melbourne and Adelaide are another entity, possibly a new taxon.

Riccia macrospora, SEM image of the characteristic spores (lectotype, G). Photo: C. Cargill.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona, JSTOR or the Swainsona back-up site.

2019-20 Weeds Report now available

The State Herbarium of South Australia documents all known plant taxa (species, sub-species, varieties and forms) native and naturalised (weedy) in South Australia. These taxa are listed in the Census of South Australian Plants, Algae and Fungi. All newly discovered State and regional records are added to the Census throughout the year. The records are based on preserved plant specimens, verified by a botanists, and housed in the vaults of the State Herbarium.

Hedera hibernica at Leg of Mutton Lake, Mount Gambier. Photo: A. Laslett.

For all new records of non-native plants, an annual report is produced by the Weeds Botanist Chris Brodie and colleagues from the State Herbarium. The report includes the list of new weeds recorded for South Australia with locations, descriptions, and photographs. Also documented are updates to other taxa that have had a change in distribution, weed status or name. Other activities carried out by Weeds Botanist are also summarised, such as field trips or presentations to community groups.

The latest report is now available online:

Brodie, C.J., Lang, P.J., Vonow, H.P. & Waycott, M. (2020). Regional Landscape Surveillance for New Weed Threats Project, 2019-2020: Annual report on new plant naturalisations in South Australia. (16mb PDF).

Also available for download are last year’s 2018-19 report (4.2mb PDF), as well as the reports for 2017-18 (4.5mb PDF), 2016-17 (3.8mb PDF) and a compilation of all reports from 2010 to 2016 (3.7mb PDF).

These reports highlights to land managers, which non-native plant species have recently been found in South Australia and where. New records are listed as either “naturalised/established” (*) or “questionably naturalised/established” (?e).

Isopogon latifolius, naturalised in South Australia. Photo: C.J. Brodie.

Naturalised plant taxa are those that have originally been introduced by humans to an area, deliberately or accidentally. They have self-propagated without aid where they are not wanted, possibly spreading by natural means to new areas. Examples listed in the recent report is Hedera hibernica (Irish ivy Link here) from Europe and the closely related Hedera algeriensis (Algerian ivy), originally from Northern Africa. Both of are examples of garden plants that have become weedy (see also a 1985 article by P.M. Kloot; 733kb PDF). Australian species can also become weeds, with Isopogon latifolius (Drumsticks) and Eucalyptus salubris (Gimlet) both from WA.

Questionably Naturalised plant taxa (i.e. possible new weeds) are introduced non-native plants that may be self-propagating without aid, but are not well established or lack data to classify them as naturalised. An example of this are Gasteria obliqua (Lawyer’s tongue) and the hybrid Populus ×canescens (Grey poplar).

At the end of June 2020, there were 5134 vascular plant taxa recognised in South Australia, of which 1611 are weeds, i.e. 31%. This year, 17 new weeds have been added to the Census; and over the last ten years, Chris Brodie’s weed surveys have discovered 236 new naturalised plants.

Any unknown or possible new state or regional weed records should be reported to Chris Brodie (0437 825 685, chris.brodie@sa.gov.au). If you have permission from the landowner, you could press a plant, record collection data, and submit a preserved plant specimen for identification.

The pressed plant or part thereof should consist of stems with leaves attached and preferably flowers and/or fruit. Collection data includes, plant location, habitat, frequency, height and width, colour and smell, and what the plant looks like when alive and growing. Images can also help in identifying plants. Also include the date, your name and contact details.

Please use the pro-forma collection sheet (available as single page: 200kb PDF, or for double-sided printing: 220kb PDF) in pencil and submit it together with the pressed plant specimen.

Compiled by State Herbarium
weeds botanist Chris Brodie.

New journal articles: June 2020

Styphelia deserticola, flower of a new species, illustrated by H.K. Nguyen.

The State Herbarium of South Australia published three articles in Vol. 33 of its journal Swainsona online, today 12 June 2020.

(1)  M. Hislop, A taxonomic review of the Styphelia intertexta group (Ericaceae: Epacridoideae: Styphelieae). (2.8mb PDF).

Botanist Mike Hislop from the Western Australian Herbarium describes the four species belonging to the Styphelia intertexta group in this paper, two of which are new to science: S. deserticola and S. saxicolaStyphelia is a genus of shrubs endemic to Australia, in the family Ericaceae (formerly Epacridaceae).

(2) J. Kellermann, A preliminary survey of the leaf-indumentum in the Australian Pomaderreae (Rhamnaceae) using Scanning Electron Microscopy. (6.5mb PDF)

Stellate hairs on the lower surface of the leaves of Pomaderris apetala. Image: J. Kellermann.

For the first time, the hairs on the leaves of 33 species of Australian Rhamnaceae are examined and illustrated with SEM by State Herbarium botanist Jürgen Kellermann. The species all belong to the tribe Pomaderreae, which is endemic to Australia and New Zealand and characterised by the presence of stellate hairs (see H.J. Hewson, Plant indumentum; 1.5mb PDF). The most well-known genera of the tribe are CryptandraPomaderris and Spyridium.

 

(3) T. Hammer, Taxonomic evaluation of Ptilotus manglesii (Amaranthaceae) and recognition of P. davisii for two phrase names in south-west Western Australia. (2.6mb PDF)

Western Australian botanist Tim Hammer describes a new species of Ptilotus that is closely related to P. manglesii. The two species are illustrated and the nomenclatural history and typification of the two species is discussed.

Ptilotus manglesii near Darkan, W.A. Photo: R. Davis.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

New journal articles: May 2020

Hovenia dulcis. Line drawing by Anita Barley.

Today, the State Herbarium of South Australia published two articles in Vol. 33 of its journal Swainsona online.

(1)  J. Kellermann, Nomenclatural notes and typifications in Australian species of Paliureae (Rhamnaceae). (2.6mb PDF)

This is the first paper resulting from the ABRS funded research project on the plant family Rhamnaceae, undertaken by State Herbarium botanist Jürgen Kellermann and colleagues from around Australia. The nomenclature of the species of Hovenia and Ziziphus occurring in Australia is reviewed, including the role of the Paul Hermann herbarium in London; some plant names are typified. A key to the the Australian species, as well as line drawings are also provided.

(2) E.M. Davison, D. Giustiniano & J.F. Haska, Clarification of the type locality of Amanita peltigera (Agaricales, Amanitaceae), phylogenetic placement within subgenus Amanitina, and an expanded description. (2.3mb PDF).

The authors examined the native mushroom Amantia peltigera with molecular and morphological methods. They show that the type collection is from South Australia, not Western Australia, as stated in the original publication. They place the species in a phylogeny of the genus and provide a revised description and illustrations of A. peltigera.

Amanita peltigera, collected on Kangaroo Island. Photo: J.F. Haska.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

New journal articles: Jan 2020

Today, the State Herbarium of South Australia published two article in Vol. 33 of its journal Swainsona online.

(1) L. Haegi, Grammosolen (Solanaceae – Anthocercideae) revisited (6.3mb PDF)

Hon. Research Associate Laurie Haegi is an expert on the plant family Solanaceae and revises Grammosolen in this paper, a genus he erected in 1981. One new species is newly described and another species transferred from Cyphanthera to Grammosolen. The genus now consists of four species with non-overlapping distributions, from the Avon Wheatbelt through the Coolgardie, Great Victoria Desert and Mallee regions in southern Western Australia, to the Great Victoria Desert, western Gawler Ranges, Eyre Yorke Block and the Murraylands in South Australia.

Grammosolen archeri, a new species described by Laurie Haegi. Illustration by Fiona James.

(2) F. Tiver, Rytidosperma robertsoniae (Poaceae), a new species from southern Australia (1.3mb PDF)

State Herbarium Associate Fleur Tiver describes a new species of grass from southern Australia, Rytidosperma robertsoniae. It was first recognised as different from R. caespitosum by Enid Robertson, because of its different chromosome number of 2n=24. However, only now, there are enough specimens of the new taxon available to evaluate its morphology and segregate to as new. The typical form of R. caespitosum is also discussed and illustrated, and a lectotype is chosen for that species.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.