New journal articles: May 2022

Today, 20 May 2022, the State Herbarium of South Australia published four research papers in Vol. 36 of its journal Swainsona online.

Seed pods (fruits) of the new species Swainsona picta (W.A.). Photo: J. Hruban & M. Hrubanová.

(1) R.W. Davis & T.A. Hammer, Swainsona picta (Fabaceae), a new species from the Yalgoo bioregion, Western Australia (0.7 mb PDF).

The authors describe a new species of Swainsona with a particularly striking fruit. It only occurs near and on the Karara mining tenancy in the Yalgoo bioregion of Western Australia and is most closely related to S. oroboides.

(2) J. Kellermann, C. Clowes & S.J.A. Bell, A review of the Spyridium eriocephalum complex (Rhamnaceae: Pomaderreae) (7.5 mb PDF).

This and the next two papers present some of the taxonomic consequences of the recently published first comprehensive phylogeny of the genus Spyridium by Melbourne University PhD student Cat Clowes and collaborators (Clowes et al., Australian Systematic Botany 35: 95-119, 2022).

The authors revise the well-known widespread Spyridium eriocephalum and related species. The Kangaroo Island endemic var. glabrisepalum is raised to specific rank, and two new species are published: Spyridium latifolium from the Fleurieu Peninsula (S.A.) and S. undulifolium from the Goulburn River area (N.S.W.). Another taxon from New South Wales is given a phrase name, as it is only known by 3 specimens and has not been collected for 40 years: Spyridium sp. Dingo Creek (T. Tame 1011).

Spyridium eriocephalum, growing near the type location in Hobart (Tas.). Photo: M. Wapstra.

(3) J. Kellermann, C. Clowes & W.R. Barker, Spyridium bracteatum, a new species from Kangaroo Island allied to S. thymifolium (Rhamnaceae: Pomaderreae) (2.9 mb PDF).

The authors publish a new species from Kangaroo Island, known for over 30 years, but as yet unnamed. It has in the past been confused with S. thymifolium (which is also described and illustrated in the paper) and other species.

Inflorescence of Spyridium thymifolium from Fleurieu Peninsula (S.A.). Photo: J. Kellermann.

(4) J. Kellermann & C. Clowes, Spyridium longicor, a new species from Western Australia (Rhamnaceae: Pomaderreae) (2.7 mb PDF).

A new Western Australian species is described that was so far, known under the phrase name Spyridium sp. Jerdacuttup. It occurs from near Gairdner and Jerramungup townships, in Fitzgerald River National Park and eastwards to Bandalup Hill, Cheadanup Nature Reserve, Wittenoom Hills and with easternmost populations near Condingup.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona or the Swainsona back-up site.

New reseach papers: Apr. 2022

Hemistemma aubertii, the type of Hibbertia subg. Hemistemma. Illustration in Du Petit Thouars, Histoire des végétaux recueillis dans les isles australes d’Afrique.

Tim Hammer is currently undertaking a post-doc at the State Herbarium of South Australia and The University of Adelaide, working on the genus Hibbertia for the Flora of Australia, He is collaborating with Hon. Research Associate Hellmut Toelken, a world-expert on the genus.

Today, 5 Apr. 2022, two research papers by Tim and co-authors were published online…

(1) J. Kellermann, T.A. Hammer & H.R. Toelken, Uncovering the correct publication date, spelling and attribution for the basionym of Hibbertia subg. Hemistemma (Dilleniaceae). Taxon 71.

The authors resolve a complex nomenclatural issue, namely the spelling, author ship and correct publication date of Hemistemma, the basionym of Hibbertia subg. Hemistemma, which contains many well-known species from eastern Australia. It was published in the journal of the International Association of Plant TaxonomistsTaxon.

(2) T.A. Hammer & K.R. Thiele, Hibbertia archeri (Dilleniaceae), a new and rare species from Western Australia with transcontinental affinities. Swainsona 36: 67-70 (1.6mb PDF).

A new species of Hibbertia from north-east of Esperance is published today in Vol. 36 the State Herbarium’s journal Swainsona online. It is only known from two populations, c. 40 km apart. It is most closely related to species of the Hibbertia stricta species group from eastern Australia, e.g. H. deviatataH. setivera and H. riparia.

Hibbertia archeri, the new species from Western Australia. Photo: E.D. Adams.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona or the Swainsona back-up site.

New journal articles: Mar. 2022

The State Herbarium of South Australia published the first three articles in this year’s volume (Vol. 36) of its journal Swainsona online, today, 25 Mar. 2022. All papers deal with fungi and lichens.

Neophyllis melacarpa from Tasmania. Photo: J. Jarman.

(1) G. Kantvilas, The trouble with Neophyllis pachyphylla (lichenised Ascomycetes). (4.2mb PDF).

The author resolves the confusion about the two species of the lichen genus Neophyllis, which consists of one widespread species N. melacarpa, mainly occuring on wood (N.S.W., Victoria, Tasmania and New Zealand), and the rarely seen N. pachyphylla, which grows directly on rock and rocky soils (N.S.W., Victoria, Tasmania).

Lactarius deliciosus. Photos: J. Cooper et al.

(2) J.A. Cooper, J. Nuytink & T. Lebel, Confirming the presence of some introduced Russulaceae species in Australia and New Zealand. (8.6mb PDF)

This study gives an overview of introduced fungi of the genera Russula and Lactarius in Australia andf New Zealand. These often occur in the soil near introduced tree species, but some are now also associated with native trees. Seven Lactarius and six Russula species are described and illustrated in detail. Molecular data confirmed the identifications of the taxa.

(3) T. Lebel, N. Davoodian, M.C. Bloomfield, K. Syme, T.W. May, K. Hosaka & M.A. Castellano, A mixed bag of sequestrate fungi from five different families: Boletaceae, Russulaceae, Psathyrellaceae, Strophariaceae, and Hysterangiaceae. (14mb PDF).

Truffles and truffle-like (sequestrate) fungi occur in many different groups of fungi. In this international collaboration, the authors describe two new genera (Amylotrama and Statesia), seven new species, and make four new combinations for truffles from five different families, occurring in Australia, New Caledonia and Europe

Coprinopsis pulchricaerulea, a new species of truffle-like fungus from New South Wales and New Caledonia. Photos: S. Axford.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona or the Swainsona back-up site.

International Women’s Day

Celebrating International Women’s Day in 2022

Lets celebrate the Wonderful Women in Science and Conservation at the Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium and they work they do! A huge thank you to all the amazing women I work with and who inspire and challenge me every day! International Womens Day 2022

I encourage everyone to take a moment to think about the women you work with who you respect, admire and want to recognise in small or grand ways! Then do so!

Michelle Waycott
Chief Botanist