New journal articles: Jan 2020

Today, the State Herbarium of South Australia published two article in Vol. 33 of its journal Swainsona online.

(1) L. Haegi, Grammosolen (Solanaceae – Anthocercideae) revisited (6.3mb PDF)

Hon. Research Associate Laurie Haegi is an expert on the plant family Solanaceae and revises Grammosolen in this paper, a genus he erected in 1981. One new species is newly described and another species transferred from Cyphanthera to Grammosolen. The genus now consists of four species with non-overlapping distributions, from the Avon Wheatbelt through the Coolgardie, Great Victoria Desert and Mallee regions in southern Western Australia, to the Great Victoria Desert, western Gawler Ranges, Eyre Yorke Block and the Murraylands in South Australia.

Grammosolen archeri, a new species described by Laurie Haegi. Illustration by Fiona James.

(2) F. Tiver, Rytidosperma robertsoniae (Poaceae), a new species from southern Australia (1.3mb PDF)

State Herbarium Associate Fleur Tiver describes a new species of grass from southern Australia, Rytidosperma robertsoniae. It was first recognised as different from R. caespitosum by Enid Robertson, because of its different chromosome number of 2n=24. However, only now, there are enough specimens of the new taxon available to evaluate its morphology and segregate to as new. The typical form of R. caespitosum is also discussed and illustrated, and a lectotype is chosen for that species.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

Swainsona hardcopies available

Hardcopies of two volumes of the State Herbarium of South Australia‘s journal Swainsona are now available for purchase.

Vol. 31 contains regular papers of the years 2017/18. The table of contents is available here. Retail price $50.

Vol. 32 is the special volume on Lichens of Kangaroo Island. All species that occur in the region are listed in “An annotated catalogue of the lichens of Kangaroo Island, South Australia”. An overview of this project (3.3mb PDF) that was published in Vol. 30 of the journal is also reprinted in this hardcopy edition. Retail price $42.

Hardcopy of the special volume was officially launched in Hobart by the author, lichenologist Gintaras Kantvilas, in November 2019. Dr Kantvilas is one of Australia’s foremost lichen experts and the Head of the Tasmanian Herbarium.

“This magnum opus presents the results of over 10 years of work on the lichens of Kangaroo Island. During this time, the author undertook extensive fieldwork and reviewed more than 1500 herbarium specimens. The lichen flora of Kangaroo Island consists of 366 taxa, of which 14 are restricted to the island. Ninety-five species are reported for South Australia for the first time, of which 19 are also new records for Australia.

This landmark study is the first to thoroughly examine and document the lichens of the Kangaroo Island. Each species is listed with a short, diagnostic description, many are illustrated with photographs. All specimens used to compile the catalogue of lichens are listed, making this publication an invaluable tool for future research. A brief history of lichenological work on the island is included, as well as a description of the habitats that lichens occur in.”

Published a few months before the devastating bushfires, this volume provides a unique insight into the lichen flora of the island and includes many records from areas that have been burned. It is is also available online (27.9mb PDF).

Gintaras Kantvilas and Brigitte de Villiers at the launch of “Lichens of Kangaroo Island” in front of a photo from the island. Photo: G.Kantvilas.

The volumes can be purchased from the front desk of the Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Goodman Building, Hackney Road, Adelaide (phone: 08 8222 9311). Postage will be added, depending on destination.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976) online, please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

New journal article: Dec. 2019

Today, the State Herbarium of South Australia published one article in its journal Swainsona online.

D. Nicolle & M.E. French, Validation of four new combinations in Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) from south-western Western Australia (80kb PDF)

In their new book, Eucalypts of Western Australia: The South-West Coast and Ranges (2019), the authors published new combinations for four taxa of Eucalyptus. By accident, the basionym was not cited correctly, rendering these new names invalid according to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (current Shenzhen edition from 2018). Nicolle & French validate the names in this short communication.

This is the first time, a SHORT COMMUNICATION has been published in Swainsona. The Editorial Committee encourages authors who want to publish short papers with nomenclatural changes, typifications, systematic notes, new records of native or weed species, etc., to submit their manuscripts to the Editor. Short communications should not exceed four printed pages.

Eucalyptus redunca subsp. pluricaulis (Brooker & Hopper) D.Nicolle & M.E.French, one of the new names validated in this Short Communication. Image: Euclid/CSIRO.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

New seedbank stamps

This month, Australian Post released a new set of three stamps about seed banking in Australia. The stamps feature seeds of rare and threatened Australian plants:

The seed image of the South Australian species were provided by the South Australian Seed Conservation Centre at the Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium. The Seed Centre collects seeds from regions across the state to safeguard them in long term storage at sub-zero temperatures. By 2020, the centre aims to have at least 90 per cent of SA’s threatened plant species in the seedbank. The Australian Seed Bank Partnership facilitates and coordinates the activities of the country’s seedbanks.

Details on the individual stamps and an article on seed conservation can be found on the Australia Post website.

2018-19 Weeds Report now available

The State Herbarium of South Australia documents all known plant taxa (species, sub-species, varieties and forms) native and naturalised (weedy) in South Australia. These taxa are listed in the Census of South Australian Plants, Algae and Fungi. All newly discovered state and regional records are added to the Census throughout the year. The records are based on preserved plant specimens, verified by a botanists, and housed in the vaults of the State Herbarium.

Acacia cardiophylla from NSW, naturalised in South Australia. Image by Bidgee (CC-BY-SA 2.5 AU).

For all new records of non-native plants, an annual report is produced by the Weeds Botanist Chris Brodie and colleagues from the State Herbarium. The report includes the list of new weeds recorded for South Australia with locations, descriptions, and photographs. Also documented are updates to other taxa that have had a change in distribution, weed status or name. Other activities carried out by Weeds Botanist are also summarised, such as field trips or presentations to community groups.

The latest report is now available online:

Brodie, C.J., Lang, P.J. & Waycott, M. (2019). Regional Landscape Surveillance for New Weed Threats Project, 2018-2019: Annual report on new plant naturalisations in South Australia. (4.2mb PDF).

Also available for download are last year’s 2018 report (4.5mb PDF), as well as the report for 2017 (3.8mb PDF) and a compilation of all reports from 2010 to 2016 (3.7mb PDF).

Callitris oblonga subsp. oblonga growing in the Adelaide Hills. Image by C.J. Brodie showing old fruits.

These reports highlights to land managers, which non-native plant species have recently been found in South Australia and where. New records are listed as either “naturalised/established” (*) or “questionably naturalised/established” (?e).

Naturalised plant taxa are those that have originally been introduced by humans to an area, deliberately or accidentally. They have self-propagated without aid where they are not wanted, possibly spreading by natural means to new areas. An example listed in the recent report is Atriplex amnicola (river saltbush; 365kb PDF) from W.A. or Callitris oblonga subsp. oblonga (South Esk pine), originally from Tasmania. Both of are examples of Australian plants that have become weedy (see also a 1985 article by P.M. Kloot; 733kb PDF).

Questionably Naturalised plant taxa (i.e. possible new weeds) are introduced non-native plants that may be self-propagating without aid, but are not well established or lack data to classify them as naturalised. An example of this are Aloiampelos ciliaris (climbing aloe) and the hybrid Eucalyptus steedmanii × Eucalyptus sp. (Steedman’s mallet hybrid).

Any unknown or possible new state or regional weed records should be reported to Chris Brodie (0437 825 685, chris.brodie@sa.gov.au).