Category Archives: Publications

Eyre Peninsula plants book

A new book on the plants of southern Eyre Peninsula has just been published:

Saunders, Brian (2018). Flowering plants of lower Eyre Peninsula: An illustrated tour of the native flora, 200 pp. Camden Park: Lane Print & Post.

The book is a photographic identification guide to the more common plants of the area, with brief notes on their distribution and biology. The southern half of Eyre Peninsula is home to many remarkable plants, including some which are endemic to the region. A list of all EP native plants can be found through the eFloraSA website.

State Herbarium of South Australia botanist Peter Lang was heavily involved in the book project, advising Brian on the correct names of plants and checking text and images.

The publication is available in shops in Coffin Bay, Port Lincoln and Adelaide at $25.

Other well-known identification guides by the author include:

 

New journal article: Nov. 2018

The State Herbarium of South Australia published one article in the online version of Vol. 30 of the journal Swainsona, today. This volume of the journal contains the Proceedings of the Botany SymposiumBotany 2016 — Past, present and future“, which was held at the 2016 NRM Science Conference. to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the State Herbarium.

J.M. Huisman & R.N. Baldock, The marine benthic algae of South Australia (1.6mb PDF)

Inkyluea ballioides, a marine algae from S.A., Vic. and Tas. (also known as Ballia ballioides). Photo: B.Baldock.

The authors review the history and current status of phycological research in South Australia. They point to the importance of Prof. Bryan Womersley‘s work, whose Marine benthic flora of southern Australia (1984-2003) documented the algal diversity of our coasts in exemplary detail and critically revised many groups of algae. They also discuss the impact of new molecular methods and the continuing importance of herbaria, as well as pointing out some current and future challenges.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

Scanned volumes of the Marine benthic flora of southern Australia are available on the Enviro Data SA web-site:

IIntroduction, Seagrasses, Chlorophyta and Charophyta (1984) (21.2mb PDF)
IIPhaeophyta and Chrysophyta (Vaucheria) (1987)  (31mb PDF)
IIIA Rhodophyta: Bangiophyceae and Florideophyceae (Acrochaetiales, Nemaliales, Gelidiales, Hildenbrandiales and Gigartinales) (1994) (36.6mb PDF)
IIIBRhodophyta: Gracilariales, Rhodymeniales, Corallinales and Bonnemaisoniales (1996) (29.3mb PDF)
IIICRhodophyta: Ceramiales – Ceramiaceae, Dasyaceae (1998) (36.3mb PDF)
IIID Rhodophyta: Ceramiales – Delessariaceae, Sarcomeniaceae, Rhodomelaceae (2003) (40.3mb PDF)

The scans are made available in collaboration with the Australian Biological Resources Study, Canberra. Fact-sheets on all south Australian algae, based on the book series, are also available through the eFloraSA system.

New journal articles: Sep. 2018

Today, the State Herbarium of South Australia published two article in the online version of Vol. 31 of the journal Swainsona.

(1) P.S. Catcheside & D.E.A. Catcheside, Antrelloides atroceracea, a new genus and species in the Pezizaceae (Pezizales) from Australia (4.7mb PDF)

Antrelloides atroceracea. Photo: D.E.A. Catcheside.

Hon. Research Associate Pam Catcheside publishes a new species of fungi that taxon occurs on Kangaroo Island and in Western Australia. Especially exciting is the fact that this species also belongs to a new genus. The authors examined the taxon with molecular methods and present its placement in a phylogeny of related genera of Pezizales. They also present detailed morphological observations on the new species. Because of its appearance, it is nick-named “Black Shoe Leather”.

(2) T.A. Hammer, The Ptilotus murrayi species group: synonymisation of P. petiolatus under P. murrayi and description of the new Western Australian species P. unguiculatus (Amaranthaceae) (1.7mb PDF)

Ptilotus unguiculatus inflorescence from the type specimen (PERTH).

Tim Hammer from The University of Western Australia describes a new species of Ptilotus (mulla mulla), which is only known from one collection from Eddaggee Station, in the Shark Bay area of Western Australia. He compares it with related species, including P. murrayi, which also occurs in the far north-east of South Australia.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

 

2017-18 Weeds report now online

The State Herbarium of South Australia documents all known plant taxa (species, sub-species, varieties and forms) native and naturalised (weedy) in South Australia. These taxa are listed in the Census of South Australian Plants, Algae and Fungi. All newly discovered state and regional records are added to the Census throughout the year. The records are based on preserved plant specimens, verified by a botanists, and housed in the vaults of the State Herbarium.

Population of Chasmanthe aethiopica at Penneshaw (C.J.Brodie 7912), a new weed recorded for South Australia. Photos: C.J. Brodie.

For all new records of non-native plants, an annual report is produced by the Weeds Botanist Chris Brodie and colleagues from the State Herbarium. The report includes the list of new weeds recorded for South Australia with locations, descriptions, and photographs. Also documented are updates to other taxa that have had a change in distribution, weed status or name. Other activities carried out by Weeds Botanist are also summarised, such as field trips or presentations to community groups.

The latest report is now available online:

Brodie, C.J., Lang, P.J., Canty, P.D. & Waycott, M. (2018). Regional Landscape Surveillance for New Weed Threats Project, 2017-2018: Annual report on new plant naturalisations in South Australia. (4.5mb PDF).

Also available for download are last year’s 2017 report (3.8mb PDF) and a compilation of all reports from 2010 to 2016 (3.7mb PDF).

These reports highlights to land managers, which non-native plant species have recently been found in South Australia and where. New records are listed as either “naturalised/established” (*) or “questionably naturalised/established” (?e).

Naturalised plant taxa are those that have originally been introduced by humans to an area, deliberately or accidentally. They have self-propagated without aid where they are not wanted, possibly spreading by natural means to new areas. An example listed in the recent report is Chasmanthe aethiopica (small cobra lily) or Eucalyptus densa subsp. densa. It is an attractive red-flowered bulbous herbaceous perennial plant. It was found naturalised on the upper dunes at Penneshaw beach on Kangaroo Island. This is the first record of this taxa growing wild in Australia.

Questionably Naturalised plant taxa (i.e. possible new weeds) are introduced non-native plants that may be self-propagating without aid, but are not well established or lack data to classify them as naturalised. An example of this in the report are a selection of species of eucalypts from W.A. and eastern Australia, including: E. eremophila subsp. eremophila, E. forrestiana, E stoatei and E. torquata.

Any unknown or possible new state or regional weed records should be reported to Chris Brodie (0437 825 685, chris.brodie@sa.gov.au).

Contributed by State Herbarium Weeds Botanist Chris Brodie.

New Journal articles: May 2018

Today, the State Herbarium of South Australia published two articles in the online version of Swainsona.

In Vol. 30 we continue to publish papers from the Proceedings of the Botany SymposiumBotany 2016 — Past, present and future“, which was held at the 2016 NRM Science Conference. to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the State Herbarium.

(1) G.R. Guerin, M.J. Christmas, B. Sparrow & A.J. Lowe, Projected climate change implications for the South Australian flora (0.6mb PDF).

The authors explore the implications of climatic warming for individual plant species and the State’s plant biodiversity. As case study they use Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima. The authors conclude that significant climate change will influence ecophysiology, leading to changes in primary productivity and water stress. This is predicted to ultimately lead to lower species richness, altered species composition and more uneven abundances.

Vol. 31 of Swainsona contains one new taxonomic paper.

Type specimen of Lindernia scapigera, collected by Robert Brown in 1802 and examined by Bill Baker for his paper. Photo: Natural History Museum, London (CC-BY 4.0).

(2) W.R. Barker, Notes on the taxonomy of Australian Lindernia subg. Didymadenia (Linderniaceae) (1.3mb PDF).

Subgenus Didymadenia (Linderniaceae) contains the majority of taxa of Lindernia that occur in Australia. Bill Barker divides the subgenus into five sections and describes 22 new species. The typification of 5 existing taxa is discussed and resolved. This paper is partly based on the most recent phylogeny of Lindernia by Ed Biffin and co-authors, which will be published shortly in Australian Systematic Botany. It is a precursor to a forthcoming larger study of the genus.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.