Category Archives: Publications

New journal articles: June 2020

Styphelia deserticola, flower of a new species, illustrated by H.K. Nguyen.

The State Herbarium of South Australia published three articles in Vol. 33 of its journal Swainsona online, today 12 June 2020.

(1)  M. Hislop, A taxonomic review of the Styphelia intertexta group (Ericaceae: Epacridoideae: Styphelieae). (2.8mb PDF).

Botanist Mike Hislop from the Western Australian Herbarium describes the four species belonging to the Styphelia intertexta group in this paper, two of which are new to science: S. deserticola and S. saxicolaStyphelia is a genus of shrubs endemic to Australia, in the family Ericaceae (formerly Epacridaceae).

(2) J. Kellermann, A preliminary survey of the leaf-indumentum in the Australian Pomaderreae (Rhamnaceae) using Scanning Electron Microscopy. (6.5mb PDF)

Stellate hairs on the lower surface of the leaves of Pomaderris apetala. Image: J. Kellermann.

For the first time, the hairs on the leaves of 33 species of Australian Rhamnaceae are examined and illustrated with SEM by State Herbarium botanist Jürgen Kellermann. The species all belong to the tribe Pomaderreae, which is endemic to Australia and New Zealand and characterised by the presence of stellate hairs (see H.J. Hewson, Plant indumentum; 1.5mb PDF). The most well-known genera of the tribe are CryptandraPomaderris and Spyridium.

 

(3) T. Hammer, Taxonomic evaluation of Ptilotus manglesii (Amaranthaceae) and recognition of P. davisii for two phrase names in south-west Western Australia. (2.6mb PDF)

Western Australian botanist Tim Hammer describes a new species of Ptilotus that is closely related to P. manglesii. The two species are illustrated and the nomenclatural history and typification of the two species is discussed.

Ptilotus manglesii near Darkan, W.A. Photo: R. Davis.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

New journal articles: May 2020

Hovenia dulcis. Line drawing by Anita Barley.

Today, the State Herbarium of South Australia published two articles in Vol. 33 of its journal Swainsona online.

(1)  J. Kellermann, Nomenclatural notes and typifications in Australian species of Paliureae (Rhamnaceae). (2.6mb PDF)

This is the first paper resulting from the ABRS funded research project on the plant family Rhamnaceae, undertaken by State Herbarium botanist Jürgen Kellermann and colleagues from around Australia. The nomenclature of the species of Hovenia and Ziziphus occurring in Australia is reviewed, including the role of the Paul Hermann herbarium in London; some plant names are typified. A key to the the Australian species, as well as line drawings are also provided.

(2) E.M. Davison, D. Giustiniano & J.F. Haska, Clarification of the type locality of Amanita peltigera (Agaricales, Amanitaceae), phylogenetic placement within subgenus Amanitina, and an expanded description. (2.3mb PDF).

The authors examined the native mushroom Amantia peltigera with molecular and morphological methods. They show that the type collection is from South Australia, not Western Australia, as stated in the original publication. They place the species in a phylogeny of the genus and provide a revised description and illustrations of A. peltigera.

Amanita peltigera, collected on Kangaroo Island. Photo: J.F. Haska.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

New journal articles: Jan 2020

Today, the State Herbarium of South Australia published two article in Vol. 33 of its journal Swainsona online.

(1) L. Haegi, Grammosolen (Solanaceae – Anthocercideae) revisited (6.3mb PDF)

Hon. Research Associate Laurie Haegi is an expert on the plant family Solanaceae and revises Grammosolen in this paper, a genus he erected in 1981. One new species is newly described and another species transferred from Cyphanthera to Grammosolen. The genus now consists of four species with non-overlapping distributions, from the Avon Wheatbelt through the Coolgardie, Great Victoria Desert and Mallee regions in southern Western Australia, to the Great Victoria Desert, western Gawler Ranges, Eyre Yorke Block and the Murraylands in South Australia.

Grammosolen archeri, a new species described by Laurie Haegi. Illustration by Fiona James.

(2) F. Tiver, Rytidosperma robertsoniae (Poaceae), a new species from southern Australia (1.3mb PDF)

State Herbarium Associate Fleur Tiver describes a new species of grass from southern Australia, Rytidosperma robertsoniae. It was first recognised as different from R. caespitosum by Enid Robertson, because of its different chromosome number of 2n=24. However, only now, there are enough specimens of the new taxon available to evaluate its morphology and segregate to as new. The typical form of R. caespitosum is also discussed and illustrated, and a lectotype is chosen for that species.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

Swainsona hardcopies available

Hardcopies of two volumes of the State Herbarium of South Australia‘s journal Swainsona are now available for purchase.

Vol. 31 contains regular papers of the years 2017/18. The table of contents is available here. Retail price $50.

Vol. 32 is the special volume on Lichens of Kangaroo Island. All species that occur in the region are listed in “An annotated catalogue of the lichens of Kangaroo Island, South Australia”. An overview of this project (3.3mb PDF) that was published in Vol. 30 of the journal is also reprinted in this hardcopy edition. Retail price $42.

Hardcopy of the special volume was officially launched in Hobart by the author, lichenologist Gintaras Kantvilas, in November 2019. Dr Kantvilas is one of Australia’s foremost lichen experts and the Head of the Tasmanian Herbarium.

“This magnum opus presents the results of over 10 years of work on the lichens of Kangaroo Island. During this time, the author undertook extensive fieldwork and reviewed more than 1500 herbarium specimens. The lichen flora of Kangaroo Island consists of 366 taxa, of which 14 are restricted to the island. Ninety-five species are reported for South Australia for the first time, of which 19 are also new records for Australia.

This landmark study is the first to thoroughly examine and document the lichens of the Kangaroo Island. Each species is listed with a short, diagnostic description, many are illustrated with photographs. All specimens used to compile the catalogue of lichens are listed, making this publication an invaluable tool for future research. A brief history of lichenological work on the island is included, as well as a description of the habitats that lichens occur in.”

Published a few months before the devastating bushfires, this volume provides a unique insight into the lichen flora of the island and includes many records from areas that have been burned. It is is also available online (27.9mb PDF).

Gintaras Kantvilas and Brigitte de Villiers at the launch of “Lichens of Kangaroo Island” in front of a photo from the island. Photo: G.Kantvilas.

The volumes can be purchased from the front desk of the Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Goodman Building, Hackney Road, Adelaide (phone: 08 8222 9311). Postage will be added, depending on destination.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976) online, please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.

New journal article: Dec. 2019

Today, the State Herbarium of South Australia published one article in its journal Swainsona online.

D. Nicolle & M.E. French, Validation of four new combinations in Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) from south-western Western Australia (80kb PDF)

In their new book, Eucalypts of Western Australia: The South-West Coast and Ranges (2019), the authors published new combinations for four taxa of Eucalyptus. By accident, the basionym was not cited correctly, rendering these new names invalid according to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (current Shenzhen edition from 2018). Nicolle & French validate the names in this short communication.

This is the first time, a SHORT COMMUNICATION has been published in Swainsona. The Editorial Committee encourages authors who want to publish short papers with nomenclatural changes, typifications, systematic notes, new records of native or weed species, etc., to submit their manuscripts to the Editor. Short communications should not exceed four printed pages.

Eucalyptus redunca subsp. pluricaulis (Brooker & Hopper) D.Nicolle & M.E.French, one of the new names validated in this Short Communication. Image: Euclid/CSIRO.

To access content of all volumes of Swainsona and the Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens since Vol. 1 (1976), please visit the journal’s web-site at flora.sa.gov.au/swainsona.